My Potty-Mouth Rant

It pisses me off, if you’ll pardon the expression, to wait in line for a seat in a women’s restroom, legs squeezed tight, while men breeze into their john without delay, undoubtedly passing empty stalls on their way to the urinals. Unisex lavatories would put a stop to this. They would also make life easier for many men as well as women. Restroom doors would no longer present MensWomensinsuperable barriers to fathers with small daughters or anyone with a disabled or elderly companion who needs help using a public toilet. Unisex bathrooms would also be more welcoming to people with unconventional gender identities.

Establishments with one-seat men’s and women’s lavatories can easily make both of them unisex, and more and more are doing so. That way, it’s first come, first serve for either facility. Fair enough.

Restrooms built for crowds could be reconfigured, with privacy walls separating the men’s urinals from the stalls, baby-changing tables, and washbasins available to everyone. Or urinals could be removed, so that everyone uses a stall. Although some men may need to be trained not to hose down the fixtures and everything around them, they’d be relieved of any anxiety about how their equipment measures up to what the other guys are pointing at the porcelain.

While the restroom renovators are at it, I wish they’d get rid of those automatic fixtures that have become ubiquitous. Automatic flushers are inclined to flush repeatedly for no apparent reason. Those that don’t waste oceans of water in this manner often don’t flush at all, and the bowls remain disgustingly full when people walk away expecting that they will. Then there are those automatic soap dispensers, which squirt their contents around and beyond the basin indiscriminately, much like the aforementioned men. Really, people, how much trouble is it to pull a flush lever or press a soap dispenser the way we did in the old days?

 

 

 

 

One Response

  1. Barbara L
    | Reply

    Amen on all counts!

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